Music Modernization and the Labyrinth of Streaming

he shift from record sales to music streaming has revolutionized the music industry. The federal copyright regime, which is rooted in a system of economic rewards based largely on sales, has been slow to adapt. This has impaired the ability of copyright law to channel appropriate royalties to songwriters, music publishers, and recording artists when the streaming of their works displaces record sales.

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Clicks at Any Cost: Why Regulation Won’t Upend the Economics of Fake News

We argue that government-imposed, speech-limiting restrictions cannot contain fake news and, as a result, should not be the answer to the modern fake news epidemic. Instead, the key to combatting the effects of fake news lies in a variety of private-sector initiatives and speech-enhancing protocols. Programs designed to reiterate the importance of media literacy and revitalize civic participation are the cornerstone to ensuring a successful democracy in a digital world.

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Invisible Inequality and Economic Empowerment: Domestic Violence, Discrimination, and the Creation of a New Protected Class

Today, there is a large population of Americans whose plight is invisible to much of the rest of society – the survivors of domestic and sexual abuse and violence. While in the last few years survivors’ voices are beginning to be heard, the legal landscape is still lagging far behind and is sorely inadequate to provide protections and relief to survivors in many areas of life.

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A Slanted View on the Morality Bars: Matal v. Tam, In re Brunetti, and the Future of Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act

Section 2(a) of the Lanham Act contained two “morality bars” to the registration of trademarks: the Disparagement Clause and the Immoral and Scandalous Clause. Two recent cases, the Supreme Court decision in Matal v. Tam and the subsequent decision from the Federal Circuit, In re Brunetti, both held that the morality bars violate the First Amendment.

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Getting Their Fix: Doctor’s Dependency on Big Pharma

Section 6002 of the Affordable Care Act, also known as the “Sunshine Act,” was intended to stop corrupt practices within the medical community by requiring pharmaceutical and medical device manufacturers to disclose all transfers of value of a certain amount made between them and physicians. This article suggests that the better solution to stopping corrupt practices is to ban some transfers all together.

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