Page 46-50

 
 

Transcription

I cannot at this time pretend to give a daily account of our trip of the exchange - But I can say that there were about 850 prisoners from every state in the South and not a few from Northern states. Our course was the following Mattown or Pana at the junction of the Illinois Central. Tem Haute in Indiana Henia Columbus and Dayton in Ohio to Belle Sin on the Ohio River. To this point we had cars of 2nd and 3rd passanger trains then crossing into Virginia we were installed into our cars freight and old ones. Then over the rail over the way our provisions going fast crowded up cold, to Cumberland by a road I once travelled when going to College1

Additional Information

1Cheavens went to college at both Yale University, in Connecticut and Amherst College in Massachusetts.

Map of the Confederate railroads

Map of Cheavens Travels from Alton to Vicksburg

 

 
 

Transcription

Then by Harpers Ferry when it snowed all the way to Baltimore when we arrived about 8 A.M. Sunday morning 5th April - The train remained a long time in the city - The ladies tried to give us all they could but the police forbid any communication whatever - At least we were drawn down to the Coal warf and packed on masse into a large warehouse where we remained during the day and had some crackers and raw bacon issued to us - we slept on the ground - Next morning the 6th we were taken about 10 A. M on board of the Stemer and soon after we started down the Chesapeake river1 - It was a pleasant scene to me and as I was on the hurricane deck I had a very good view –

Annotations

Cheavens refers here to the Patapsco River which empties into Chesapeake Bay.

Additional Information

Map of Cheavens Travels from Alton to Vicksburg

 

 
 

Transcription

The air at night was quite cool and on the deck was rather unpleasant sleeping but I made out - Next day about 10 we came in sight of fortress monroe where we remained some 2 hours1 anchored off the port which looked fierce with its line of non bull dogs pointing out plainly in view - There were a number of vessells at anchor among which we plainly discovered the English flag on a Man of War and a French Ship - We soon started up James river and after going up a little saw the wrecks of two of the Federal Steamers the Cumberland and one ohter which our Famous gunboat Merimac overthrew2. Their remains were above water

Annotations

1 Fort Monroe is located in Hampton Virginia and served as a fort to guard shipping between the sea and the Chesapeake Bay. It was nicknamed “Freedom’s Fortress” for any slave reaching the fort became free.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Monroe#Trivia

2 The Merrimack was destroyed by the Federals in 1861 but salvaged by Confederate forces and converted into an ironclad ship renamed the USS Virginia. In March of 1862, the USS Virginia sank the Cumberland and shelled the Congress into submission.

See http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-us-cs/csa-sh/csash-sz/virginia.htm

Additional Information

Image of Ft. Monore

Modern day image of Ft. Monore

Image of the Chesapeake Bay Blockade

Image of the Merrimack

 

 
 

Transcription

We saw the turned ship Monitor at the mouth looking like a big turtle.1 After going some distance the white Flag was raised at the bow and soon our names were called to sign a parole not to fight till exchanged for as the requesible number were not at the landing for so - We landed at City Point about dark and laid along side of another boat on board of which Fulbright and our crowd got and had a good broth in the passenger hold or cabin of the boat I enjoyed the rest - Early in the morning we discovered a train of cars on the bank of the river getting ready for us –

Annotations

The USS Monitor was a 987-ton armored turret gunboat. The Monitor and the Virginia participated in the first battle between ironclad warships and came to a tactical draw. The Federal navy had a number of “monitors” and the one to which Cheavens is referring cannot be this particular USS Monitor. The USS Monitor foundered on December 31, 1862.

See http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-usn/usnsh-m/monitor.htm

Additional Information

Image of the Monitor

Map of Cheavens Travels from Alton to Vicksburg

 

 
 

Transcription

How happy was I on April the 8th 1863 my 33rd birthday to place my foot upon Southern Soil and go upon the cars at City Point Va1 under a guard of our own men for the City of Petersburg VA - distant 20 miles. We soon went over the ground and then I saw Peach trees in full bloom2the first time this year. About 1 P.M we arrived in Petersburg. A pretty town and marching through it went to our Exchange camp at the Model Farm a mile from town - There I found many of my old friends and acquaintances. Capt Harvey McKinney of Rocheport Missouri had come from Richmodn and had by Orders from Headquarters organized the Missourian 125 exchanged in

Annotations

1 City Point Virigina, now Hopewell Virginia, was the Headquarters of Ulysses S. Grant during the siege of Petersberg in 1864 and 1865. In August of 1864, an explosion rocked City Point. A barge loaded with ammunition had exploded, killing 43 and wounding many more. After the Civil War, it was discovered that a bomb was placed on the barge by the Confederate Secret Service agent John Maxwell.

2 Image of a Peach Tree

Annotations

Image of City Point, Va

 

 
   
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