Page 61-65

 
 

Transcription

who was educated in Columbia at the State University. 2nd Lieut Qos. Jackson 3rd McCartney a fine larger - The company is made up from more trads than usual 2 blacksmiths a tailor shoe maker barber several Apothecaries several Printers several school teachers a couple of lawyers - (Stephens W.H. Harriain) - commonly called at home Harrian Bassemett - was a number of the company one of my old scholars - Mr Groomes another of my scholars joined with me - also Joel Nevins and one of the Barmes - We made quite a pleasant mess of 12 at first finally 10 - and considering all we agreed very well - On the 6th we joined and found our company with the guns was camped on the bank of Big Black River1 just below

Annotations

1 The Big Black River is in the State of Mississippi and is a tributary of the Mississippi River. It merges with the Mississippi River twenty-five miles south of Vicksburg.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Black_River

Additional Information

Image of the Big Black River

 

 
 

Transcription

the railroad bridge on the farm of a Mr Townshend who I found had been educated at Yale College a year or two before I was there - We had a Sibley tent given to our mess. We have very good rations of tuf corn meal sugar and rice - I was head of mess - I found many of my old friends and acquaintances - Don Sitton I found to be Saddler to 1st Brig - he was delighted to see us I to see him - I could tell him more than any one of his friends. We had many pleasant talks about old times - As I was in need of money he supplied me. Finaly brother to Sam Tinsly I found in the 3rd Regt. Turner who meet me in Springfield was in Gates Regt: also the husband of Mr Selfs daughters Tom. - Also Gabriel Long who staid winter before last at Will Bass –

 

 
 

Transcription

To all then it seemed as if it were a heavenly blessing to see old friends - We remained but a few days before the toesin sounded the enemy is coming - We all prepared to meet them. Men were working on the beast work on the eastern band of Big Black - Then we were drilled in Artillery tactics. My first was given me No 6 - which is the cutting of fuses and change of the ammunition in the Limber - On the 10th May we made a move on a false alarm on the 12th are started towards Edwards station a few miles to the south of which we staid one night and 2 part of the day - It rained nearly all the time. Next day I went out on picket towards Raymond. Where we distinclty heard the Federal drums - we remained the night of the 14th and then moved on

Additional Information

Image of the Vicksburg Campaign

 

 
 

Transcription

The night of the 15th we camped in an orchard on Bakers creek as it is called1 In the morning 16th bright and early I arose and soon found a sweet potatoe patch and then had a camp kettle on quick enough I scarcely had them cooked before we heard the guns popping in front.2 The orders were soon given to harness up and we were soon put in position on a hill by some cabins. After cutting down some trees to begin we then changed position to a field in our rear we first went to a wood then out on we converged in the field: we were then ordered into a wood where our guns (Parrot) did their first firing - then we were ordered onwards to where a number of negro cabins were in a field

Annotations

1 Located along the Big Black River Basin as shown here

2 The Battle of Champion Hill (also called the Battle of Baker’s Creek) was fought immediately before the Battle of Vicksburg. Ulysses S. Grant and his Tennessee army pursued the Confederates who were retreating from Jackson, led by Lieutenant General John C. Pemberton, to Baker’s Creek and finally Vicksburg.

See http://www.nps.gov/history/hps/abpp/battles/ms009.htm; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Champion_Hill

 

 
 

Transcription

Then we came to a stand - There we wer ordered into a field where McKinneys company passed us charging the enemy. We fired but one shot here. One of our drivers here was shot in the arm by a minnie ball. The balls were flying thick around us. Our men were mostly behind trees - Soon the enemy gave signs of flanking us on the night so we fell back to the road just out of the field and there we went to work in good earnest and if ever boys worked it was there we fired 25 or 30 rounds of sphirical case and bombs at them which ___ could them - I worked till the pospiration fell in the arms from me. I knew not the evening fired a shot when we were in the mess of it and the swab buckets got dry one of the

 

 
   
University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law © 2010