Page 66-70

 
 

Transcription

boys took the old leather bucket to a neighboring hog wallow and filled it. On his return all the boys rushed to get a drink, and how refreshing it was. When I got through my work I looked around, and within a few feet of me lay a Federal dead. I found some letters in his pocket, which I took and read, from people in Illinois to brothers in the army, and all that Ab. Lincoln's government is not the people's government. I also ate some provisions from a haversack. I took a Captain wounded and made him wait for our escort to take him prisoner. Piles of Federals laid all around dead. One of our batteries had been disabled here, and in consequence left a gun. One of the infantry privates worked it himself.

 

 
 

Transcription

I ate my sweet potatoes at intervals, and enjoyed them much. The dead and dying were all around us, and fast they fell. Here it was that the brave McKinney1 received his death wound of which in a few days he died. Soon came that order so galling to a soldier, Retreat!! And then through bush and brake and hill and hollow, swamp and road we kept going, till at last dark night found us behind the entrenchments at Big Black2. We slept as soldiers sleep, on the cold earth. Sunday morning, May 17ty, 1863, rose fresh and fair. Two years before I was sworn into the service of the Southern Confederacy at Jefferson City with the lamented McKinney. He is mortally wounded and I am on the eve of another battle. So the "Providence of God differs, however man prospers."

Annotations

1 Captain Harvey G. McKinney

2 River Bridge

Additional Information

Captain McKinney was from near Rocheport in Boone County Missouri. A farmer before the war, McKinney became a prominent revolutionary. He had organized a company called the Blackfoot Rangers in mid-Missouri and gained prominence at the Battle of Wilson’s Creek for securing the dead body of General Lyon. McKinney was Captain of the Fifth Missouri Regiment, Company H.

SEE PHILIP THOMAS TUCKER, WESTERNERS IN GRAY: THE MEN AND MISSIONS OF THE ELITE FIFTH MISSOURI INFANTRY REGIMENT 167-68 (1995).

 

 
 

Transcription

We were soon ordered to our position in the entrenchments. We fixed our guns and rolled cotton bales to cover our caissons. Then a foolish thing was done, our horses were ordered off the field to the rear about 3/4 mile. We awaited until the sun was fairly on his road to the zenith when the enemy made a charge on our center, but our guns soon drove them back. Yet their shell came bounding around us, throwing dirt all around, while I was behind my cotton bale gouging spherical case and reading. At last one1 on the left came sneaking along, then another, till more and more came the same road. I jumped for my neighbor's revolver, but he would not let me have it or I would have sent some back.

Annotations

1 Union soldier

 

 
 

Transcription

Col. Cockrell came to us before this and said wait till you can do execution, then fire. But the Georgia Regiment on the extreme left ran, then one and then another till at last all deserted us. The Missourians were the last to leave. And Col. Gate's Regiment were mostly left behind and many were taken prisoner. Many swam Big Black. I had to go when my orders came. The field was half a mile across and you could see men flying across pursued by the Federals. Our guns, 4 in number, 2 10-pound Parrott guns, and 2 12-pound Howitzers, were left behind. All the other Missouri Batteries had to leave the guns except Landis', who got off one or two. Alack the day.

Additional Information

Parrot Gun

10 Pound Parrot Gun

12 Pound Howitzer

 

 
 

Transcription

I took up my line of march as did the others. I ran some hundred and fifty yards, then thought I would prefer to walk, which I did, to the banks of the Big Black where we had a bridge across and were protected by some guns on the hill above. I picked up a gun, cartridge, and cap box, although we were under heavy fire all the time. Col. Cockrell was trying to bring his men into line. After crossing, I went to the first house, and finding a sauce pan I got a drink of water, quite refreshing after our run. I soon found some of our boys, and we went into the big road, where we found our officers and the artillery horses, one of which I mounted and soon was on my way.

 

 
   
University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law © 2010