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everything equally, so whether he were present or absent his part was always saved. If he was at the [breast] works it was carried to him. While the others complained of not getting their share, there was very little of it with us. I got a cup of blackberries every evening of 10 days in the graveyard. Some of our messes lost the whole of their provisions some nights by other stealing. Fighting commenced in earnest Wednesday, 20th, and charges were made by the enemy the whole of the first week in vain. We lost many, very many, brave men, but more of them lay in the sallies below our works, and after a week's hard fighting they sent a flag of truce to bury their dead. Our men fought with the

 

 
 

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energy of despair. For though on the second morning of our arrival many packed up expecting to be taken to the Northern prisons by the Yankees, yet after the first day's fight and our triumph, the courage of our men gained ground, and they rose from the Sough of Despond and seemed to stand on firm ground once more. The feeling was, "We can save half the war by keeping Vicksburg." Then came the heavy mortar fleet to work on us. I was placed on the opposite side of the peninsula and two miles from the city. The shells were 13 and 15 inch weighing 200 pounds. They were mostly directed at the City Hospital.

 

 
 

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These fell day and night in the street, some exploding a half mile in the air, others going 10 feet in the ground before exploding, and many never exploding. I was a great fear to the women and children, most of whom left their homes and lived in holes in the ground dug out laterally. Once bomb went through the Court House from the roof to ground floor, exploding on the ground. Nearly every house had one or more through it, yet very few lives were lost by these same bombs. 8 would be the amount of females and children killed. Then the gun boats would come up every now and then and give a charge.

 

 
 

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One of these charges I had the pleasure of witnessing one day from a high point on one of the ridges. 4 gun boats made the attack on the lower water batteries. We could see the flash of the guns and in about one minute the report would be heard. They fought about an hour when one rang a bell for assistance. Another came to her relief, and she was towed off. They had been hit several times. One day the Cincinnati came from above, and I thought se was running along finely when a few shots from "Whistling Dick" (An 18-poiind, rifled gun. O.R., Series 1, Volume XXIV, Part 11, 332) made her soon get to shore, where in a short time she sank above the portholes. (The Cincinnati, a turreted iron-clad Union gunboat of the largest class carrying 14 guns, was sunk by Confederate batteries on May 27, 1863. O.R., Series 1, Volume XXIV, Part 11, 332).

 

 
 

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We first volunteered as sharpshooters, and every day would find some 20 in the ditches. I was up one day. At last we had 2 guns given us, one 6 lb. And one 12 lb. I was on the 6 lb. every other day, then the 6 lb. alone every 4th day. Then we changed the 6 lb. for one on the other side of the stockade in a parapet, to which was added a 20 lb. Parrott called "Crazy Jane." Finally, a week before the surrender, we got a 10 lb. Parrott, which we dragged up the hill Sunday night. I was on the 20 lb. piece the last 2 weeks nearly all the time. It was in the following form. The gun was fired, then whirled around in the embrasure,

 

 
   
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