Page 81-85

 
 

Transcription

out of reach of the enemy's fire, while we could enjoy ourselves in the covered way, out of the sun, out of trouble. We would fire from 5 to 30 shots a day. Very few of our shots seemed to burst. We made some good shots in their White House filled with officers. We saw them skedaddle from it. Also knocked two fires with men around, going all through their sallies and killing many. A sergeant on one of their pieces got out of the notion that this parapet was casemated with

 

 
 

Transcription

the railroad iron, another said their own shots did much damage among their own men, for every shot that missed us went on and hit them. I afterwards found enough solid 32 lb. to casemate our embrasure. Many of the shells burst in our works by us, but did no damage to us or our boys. One day I had been getting ammunition from the caisson, and returning for more, found pieces which had exploded by the ammunition. Shells sometimes burst and let out the canister all around. One day after the shooting, and neglecting to drag in the piece, a shell struck the reinforcement and burst within 5 feet of me and I thought my head was split.

 

 
 

Transcription

Transcription still in progress

 

 
 

Transcription

One night while sleeping, cannon and mortar went to work in good earnest, shelling our camp. I woke about 1 o'clk, all had left the tent, and the close proximity. I took to the bank of the creek, and while there, was covered with dirt from shells. Soon after the firing ceased I returned, and found my tent with a hole made within a few inches of my bed. Several times I had shots strike within a few inches of me. In going to the ditches we had a long open space to traverse, and never did I pass without having shot, shell, or minie balls pass within a few feet or strike the ground at my feet. At night it was splendid to see the curves formed by ascending and descending shells, also to see the shells pass through the air.

 

 
 

Transcription

Mules were killed in abundance and hauled off every night to the river. Sickness was not very prevalent, and that mostly diarrhea. I was in the Hospital No. 2, where Charley Busby lay wounded of a ball at Baker's creek, in No. 3, where Smith, otherwise Cheroler, of Boone was sick. Also in the Brigade Infirmary, were Charley Selby lay sick and died just before we surrendered, Joshua Baker, who has since died, Samuel Hodge, nurse of Lieut. Selby, who went home and died in prison. {King was wounded in the forearm at Baker's [creek]....Capt. Lowe was wounded in the little toe by a shell in camp. Conelly by a piece of mortar in the forearm. Slight, while within 3 feet of me. Lieut. McCarty was killed while sitting under a tree afar from camp and out of danger, as he thought, by a ricochet shell falling perpendicular. He lived but a few hours, the top of the broken skull broken off and the brain laid bare. Thornton Porter was killed the Monday before the close of the siege by a minie through the brain, and two other the same week by the same means in ditches. None of the four ever spoke a word afterwards. They were all buried in the graveyard.} Many men were killed in camp, some reading, some sleeping. Our tents bore several marks of balls, our skillets were broken by minie balls. The blowing-up of the parapet where the 6th Mo. Was, and where Col. [Eugene] Erwin was killed, was seen by me, but while the dust was blowing I had to run the fire to attend to hand gernades.

 

 
   
University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law © 2010