Page 86-90

 
 

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At last, after 47 days hard fighting, and not a single day without the regular bom-bom sounding like a woodsman's axe, and the crash of falling trees, came the flag of truce taken out by [Lieutenant General John C.] Pemberton (bad luck to him). We had been looking for Johnson (Chevens refers here to General Joseph E. Johnston who was headquartered at Jackson, Mississippi, during June, 1863, with a force of about 28,000 men under his immediate command. O.R., Series 1, Volume XXIV, Part III, 978), and it was all the cry for Johnson in the rear. Yet, on July 3rd, terms set a going, and on July 4th were completed between [Union General] U.S. Grant and Pemberton, and abut 12 A.M. the Federals began to swarm in. I saw them all through town. Terms of capitulation were: surrender of all arms and government stores--officers to keep side arms and private property--soldiers to keep knapsacks, to be paroled, receive 5 day's provisions, to have a horse wagon for each Regt.

 

 
 

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and a two-horse wagon to each battery. Though I was hungry before; it seemed when abundance of crackers, ham, peas, and rice came all appetite left. We remained till Friday morning, when we were paroled. Saturday morning, 11th July, we started on our road towards Black [River]. And such was the ending. We travelled hard after our famine. Our men were like skeletons, and many came out but to die. It was really lamentable to see men in [the] last stages of chronic diarrhea eating green corn and green melons. One man ate 25 ears and died in 2 hours. We stopped near Big Black the first night, and then Gen. Bowen, sick with Dysentery, staid till he died in 3 days. We went on till we were tired. Joel Nevins had been quite sick, and soon gave out.

 

 
 

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I staid with Joel; all day we stopped. I ate some corn and peaches and tomatoes sparingly for fear of disease. We went on several miles and camped within 3 miles of Raymond on Sunday night. It rained Sunday night, and Monday morning. Giving my coat to Nevins, I saw him ride along. We got up with the company at Raymond, when Lieut. Catron (Lieutenant Thomas B. Catron now commanding Lowe's Missouri Battery) and Lincumfeller and Nevins had better stay, and me to nurse. I arrived in the Court House hospital, upper Courtroom of Raymond, Monday, July 13th. I took charge of my two patients. I found John Hume of Boone wounded in both thighs, yet still alive. Sergeant Henry of McKinney's Company staid to assist. A.J. Mallett is surgeon of the post. J.W. Cockram is apt. [apothacary]. B.J. Dysart of 5th Mo. is volunteering services and has the

 

 
 

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upper ward. He is a skillful and attentive surgeon, much like by all. The nurses were mostly paroled after the Baker's Creek fight to wait on the wounded. There were 100 wounded and 100 more have been added of the sick soldiers that were paroled. Of this number nearly 30 have died since I have been a nurse of this hospital, and nearly all were Vicksburg men. I gave myself up to attending. Soon the house was crowded and I had my hands full. From two it came 10, then to a quarter of the house, then Dr. Dysart had me give all the medicines, and I had abundance of work. The food was good, though not very varigated. The ladies of Raymond have been very attentive to the sick.

 

 
 

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Mrs. McCombs was ward matron, very efficient. Since gone to Texas. Mrs. Jenkins and daughter took care of the ward continually. Miss Harriet Hunter and her sister Martha have been very attentive. Also Miss Fidelia Wharton, Miss Lip Grey, Miss Mary Dabney, Mrs. Alston, Mrs. Lins, Mrs. Gibbs, and many others came to shed abroad over the sick a pleasant and homelike influence. It seemed to me a different place to what my last few months have been passed in. Everything has gone on harmoniously enough. About 1st August I was appointed Chief Ward Master and soon after, Acting Hospital Steward, and I have reason to believe I have acted with staisfaction to all. I have stood beside the beside of from

 

 
   
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