Pages 1-5

 

Transcription

My wound, having been received in August of the preceding year, kept me from active duties. 1 But on the last of July 2 the Proclamation of the Pseudo Governor 3 Gamble was received calling on all within the state of Mo., both friend and foe, to enlist in the State Militia. I found myself unwilling to obey the mandate so unceremoniously announced. So getting on my nag withou bidding my friends goodbye I once more sallied forth. Hoping to meet Col. Jo. Porter

Annotation

1. Cheavens, a private in General John B. Clark, Jr., Division, Company E, was wounded at the Battle of Wilson's Creek, August 10, 1861, when a no. 6 grape shot lodged in his right thigh, four inches above the knee breaking the bone. Columbia Missouri Statesman, August 23, 1861; Virginia Easley, ed., "Journal of the civil War in Missouri," p. 23

2. 1862

3. Hamilton R.

Additional Resources

More information on the Battle of Wilson's Creek

Wilson's Creek National Battlefield Foundation

Brief Bio of Governor Hamilton

 

 

Transcription

in the northern part of...1 On Monday Aug. 1st, evening, myself and Will Bass2 rode off and riding all night, after various adventures in finding and losing the road, at length put up at about 3 A.M. at Mr. Glasgow's in the town of Millersburg. We slept soundly until sunrise when arising we prepared for breakfast which in Great State was set before us by Miss Glasgow. There was also present a Miss Martin call Capt., being the leader of a female company. Also a school mistress in the neighborhood. We had no time to remain, so bidding our generous hosts goodbye we again moved off after those we were in search of.

Annotations

1 Confederate Colonel Joseph C. Porter was engaged in guerrilla activities in northeastern Missouri. On July 28, 1862, he had penetrated as far south as Moore's Mill in northeastern Callaway County where Union Colonel Oden Guitar, commanding the Ninth Missouri Cavalry, defeated him in a hotly contested encounter.

2 William H. Bass, Ashland, Boone County

Additional Information

Cheaven's Connection with the Bass Family

 

 
 

Transcription

We rode seven or eight miles when we encountered some of our pickets who stopped us. We willingly went with them to a spot in the woods where two or three companies were encamped commanded by Capts. Selby1, Allen and ............ We learned from them that on the previous day a skirmish had taken place at a place in Callaway Co. called Moore's Mills between Col. J. Porter and Col. O. Guitar in which the former, overpowered, had to retreat2. We remained till about 7 P.M. when we started back towards Boone. We crossed Cedar Creek and stopped near Boonesboro on Elijah Stephen's place. It rained the first night and we had poor fare.

Annotations

1 Charles Selby

2 Cheavens' chronology is confused at this point. According to his calculations the battle occurred on August 1 when in fact it was July 28.

Additional Information

Information on the Battle of Moore's Mill

 

 
 

Transcription

August 3rd, 1863--Arose from Birch bed. Capt. Julius McGuire cam around and in accordance with his suggestion we disbanded, arranging the time and place for [our] next meeting, the following week being the time appointed. I was placed under the charge of Mr. James Langston, son of Widow1 Langston, who has one son in the Confederate army and one has died in the same service.2 They live on Little Cedar Creek about a mile N.W. from Boonesboro. The family consists of the Old lady, James, and a very pleasant daughter, Nancy. I enjoyed my week very much indeed. Lived on fruits and vegetables with honey fit for a king.

Annotation

1 Cornelia

2George Thomas Langston joined the Missouri State Guard (Confederate) and fought at the battles of Lone Jack and Independence. Joseph W. Langston was fatally wounded at the Battle of Pea Ridge.

 

 
 

Transcription

August 8th, 1863. Again we were together with an increased force. I was sworn into the C.S.A.1 during the war and found a doubled barreled shot-gun to suit me. I was appointed commissary of our Squad of several companies. We were most of the time in the woods and had a different encampment every day. Sleeping and eating during the day while the night was occupied by traveling from place to place. One of our exploits during the last week of August I will describe. There were a number of Southern men imprisoned in the jail of Columbia. We squaded several of our companies under

Annotation

1 Confederate States Army

Additional Resources

Image of Cheaven's shotgun

 

 
   
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