Page 6-10

 
 

Transcription

the Captainship of Young Purcell, a brave but rash man. There were a number of us amounting to one hundred men. About 11. A.M.1 we started and entered Columbia about 1 P.M. with a whoop and a yell, clattering over the ground rough shod down to the Court House door. The Federals all ran to the University, scattering in all directions. Our men went to work breaking down the jail door and releasing the prisoners, who were led off in triumph. Nothing else was done in the town excepting taking the Federal flag floating over Redmond's building. One shot was fired by the Federals, which passed through the Court House door. We first took our picket and got 100 head of

Annotations

1 Tuesday, August 13, 1862

Additional Information

Judge Gentry’s 1913 account of the raid on Columbia

 

 
 

Transcription

Government horses which were feeding in a pasture. We then departed on the road back. We gave the flag to Mr. ......... daughters who tore it to shreds and gave them to the boys. I got a piece and gave it to my sweetheart afterwards to make a square in a quilt. That night we feasted. In a few days, Guitar1 was on our track and after us. We then had t disband and kept to the woods most of the time. During the time I staid mostly at Mrs. Langston's and again at Mr. Again's. I made two or three trips to my friends in the Southern part of the county. I went to the Self's2 and the Martin's when my other

Annotations

1 Colonel Oden Guitar, Ninth Missouri Cavalry. In August, 1862, the provisional Governor of Missouri, Hamilton Gamble, promoted Guitar to Brigadier General in the enrolled Missouri State Militia (Union)

2 Cheavens makes multiple reference to the Self’s in his journal. Following the War, Cheavens marries one of the Self daughters, Sally Self. It is not clear, but probable, that the “sweetheart” he refers to in the journal is in fact Sally

 

 
 

Transcription

friends could not meet me and have a pleasant chat.1 I would come and go in the night and then have the day for pleasure. I also exchanged my little Mexican Mustang for a large U.S. horse, captured at Columbia. I became quite a favorite with Mr. [Julius] McGuire. One night while the Feds. were in the vicinity of Cedar Creek I rode on one side of Little Cedar and their pickets were on the other bank. The next day I and my horse stood in a thicket while the Feds. were ranging the next farm not a half a mile distant. About the middle of October we were ordered to be ready by a certain night to meet Porter in Callaway Co. and cross the river.2 We were all ready. I had been

Annotations

1 Philip J. Self and Lincoln R. and Isabella Martin

2 On October 16 about 300 of Porter's guerrillas crossed the Missouri River at Portland, Callaway County, on the steamboat Emilie, which they had commandeered. Porter crossed the Missouri by row boat at Providence, Boone County, and was later killed in a skirmish near Marshfield on January 10, 1863. Richard S. Brownlee, Gray Ghosts of the Confederacy, Baton Rouge, 1958, p. 88

 

 
 

Transcription

down to Salem meeting house a got back just in time to get with our party. We rode all night and arrived about daybreak near the spot, but by some mistake we did not find them. We slept till about 8 A.M., when our provisions were brought in and Capt. Purcell, with some few others, went to find the whereabouts of Porter. I got a fishing line and went to work in the creek catching fish. Had got quite a little string when our scouts came in, stating that the Feds. were in the neighborhood and had fired on them. After cleaning my fish and putting them in a sack on the horn of my saddle I saddled up and started into line. We got to the top of the hill, and there forming a line we gave out horses to be held while

 

 
 

Transcription

we loaded our guns ready for the charge. Pretty soon we saw the Feds. skulking in the woods, then a shot or two, then more Feds. I got a crack at one or two, then a ball hit a tree near me and soon I saw Sam Hodge pulling my coatttail telling me to lie down. I soon looked around and saw all the men around me gone with three or four exceptions. I soon saw the 1st Lieut., who told me to mount my horse and retreat. I looked for Jim Boice, but he and horses were gone. I found a mule without a rider, and mounting him I started off. Two or three were wounded and one dead. Buck Lampton was wounded in the head by a glancing ball. I found my horse in camp, but lost everything on him.

 

 
   
University of Missouri-Columbia School of Law © 2010