Page 26-30

 
 

Transcription

The succeeding day I wrote home, and it never reached its place. Sunday the 23rd I went to Springfield and arrived on the 24th. I was taken to the Provost Marshall there, to the Court House, where 160 prisoners are kept on the 3rd story. I immediately found a great number of friends. Capt. W. Todd and quite a number of others. I immediately was placed in charge of the hospital containing some 30 sick. It was in a miserable state. All lying on the floor filthy, with frequently no blankets. I had two, with one in constant use in the sickroom. Many had been in prison

Additional Information

Image of the Battle of Springfield

This is the beginning of Cheaven’s recurring duties as a nurse during the civil war.

 

 
 

Transcription

for twelve months. The disease was mostly typhoid1, pneumonia, mumps, diarrhea, and measles with some scurvy and much debility. Our diet was crackers and light bread, pickled pork, beef, coffee, grits, and hominy, with a few desiccated vegetables. I tried to do my best. I was there till December 24th and I think I did my duty. During that time but five deaths occurred, while in the Federal hospitals they counted by tens daily. We cooked for the hospital in the small room where the nurses staid. I made up most of the medicines and the druggist below the balance. Dr. J. Bonfils near the Abby, St. Louis, was our first physician and a kind and considerate old man. The next was an Iowa Regt. Surgeon.

Additional Information

1 Information on Typhoid Fever

 

 
 

Transcription

The surgeons were very kind to me and allowed me many privileges such as a guard to go into town with me after clothing and cloths for dressing blisters, for food for the very sick, etc. Mr. Logan's family is to be remembered by me with the deepest gratitude on account of the many favors bestowed. I was busy all the time, scarcely a moment's leisure. A lady gave me a ball of yarn to knit a pair of mittens for a young boy, but I never found time. The days were short and we frequently had neither wood nor candles. Many nights our boys were without either. The last surgeon did all he could for the good of the sick. He procured cots and ticks

 

 
 

Transcription

filled with straw and a number of blankets with a number of changes of clothing which were also distributed. The College1 was filled with prisoners and Capt. W. Todd was sent there. He was afterwards paroled and subsequently it was taken from him and he was put in solitary confinement on a charge of breaking parole. The large room of the prison was inhabited by 160 men who slept on the bare and dirty floor, which was covered over at night so thick it was almost impossible to thread my way among them. The floor was filthy beyond comprehension, no spittoons, ambia [sic] from 160 mouths and pus from half as many, while every morning beheld one corner nearly a quarter covered with filth of the worst character.

Annotations

NEED TO FIND OUT WHAT COLLEGE THIS IS

 

 
 

Transcription

The city of Springfield contained about 2500 sick Federals. The weather was splendid. The Sergeant of the Prison was kind to us and would laugh and talk with us regularly. Several escaped while I was there. One was a fellow prisoner from Bolivar. Several tried to escape, a number took the oath some of whom joined the Feds. On the 24th December, 1862, 96 of us from the College and Court House, mostly prisoners of war, started from Springfield for St. Louis via Rolla. It commenced raining and rained for several days. We had a guard and a Major......commanded us. The number of wagons was found to be but half enough, so one

Additional Information

Map of Cheavens Travels from Springfield to Alton

 

 
   
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