Page 36-40

 
 

Transcription

commonly called the Round Room and an upper amphitheatre afterwards fitted up into 2 stories, one as a convalescent hospital the other as a dungeon. The large rooms were fitted up with 3-story double bunks with one and two stores to a room. The dining room with table and benches with the cups and plates kept in order by the dining room squad, the cook room was fitted up with brick furnaces with sheet iron boilers for boiling coffee, meat, etc., with a cook room squad, all of whom were prisoners. Then there was an office squad who called the rolls, and rolls were called every morning before breakfast.

 

 
 

Transcription

The food was boiled beef, hot and cold coffee, soup, peas, potatoes, light bread, and bacon. One meal between 9 and 11 A.M., the second between 3 and 5 P.M., rooms going out in order. Masterson was Captain of the Prison and tried to do all he could for the comfort and health of the prisoners, although he was not very affable to most. To me he always acted the perfect gentleman. 3 sergeants at every door and outside. We had a little strip of land about 4 feet wide in which there was a hydrant and the last month a yard 20 by 60 feet. The rooms were swept every morning and scrubbed every two weeks.

 

 
 

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The Hospital contained 76 bunks arranged in 8 lines or 4 wards. To every half ward or 10 patients were two nurses assigned who staid on all day, one always being present. Making 16 nurses and 2 dishwashers, in all 18. 4 stood every 4th night 2 till 12 o'clock, the other 2 the balance of the night.

It was the usual practice for the surgeon to come in the morning, make prescriptions, and have them put up. I would go around with him and then make up the medicines and give them as prescribed. We had a sink and hydrant with a bath tub in one corner of the room. Everyone who comes from the lower rooms is taken to the bathtub, a good bath given, clean clothes given, and put in clean beds. Thus vermin are excluded from them.

 

 
 

Transcription

The floors were mopped up every morning, the beds made, and each man with a fresh bowl of water to wash with. The meals consisted of light bread, beef fried and boiled, and mutton soup. The Sisters of Charity visited us every day once or more. They brought chicken soup, milk, eggs, jams, and other delicacies such as coffee and tea. These two sisters were all that were allowed to visit us. Father ........ also came and many a poor man had the benefit of the sacrament and was baptized with the holy water.1 The small-pox raged while I was there, and I have sent off as many as 10 a day to the island with it. Some few died with it in the worst form. I read a great deal of medicine and had a good deal of practice. I could tell a man with the small-pox as soon as most physicians.

Annotations

1 Griffen Frost, also a prisoner at Gratiot Street Prison at this time, wrote that a Father Ryan came in and preached a sermon.

Griffen Frost, Camp and Prison Journal (Quincy, Illinois, 1867), 29.

Additional Information

Joseph C. Babb's letter sent from small-pox island.

 

 
 

Transcription

Measles, pneumonia, chronic diarrhea, erysipelas, some wounded in the last of January, quite a few from Arkansas. Several wounded were put in the hospital and we had a convalescent room with Dan Fulbright ward master. I found in officers' quarters Ed Muir, Parson, Primrose, Lieut. Crutcher, Capt. George Langston, Capt. Jim Wilson, Major Rucker, and several others. Capt. Bob Maupin now aide to Col.1 Cockrell. Jim Monde and several others whose acquaintance I made.

Annotations

1 F.M.

 

 
   
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