CONSTITUTIONAL LAW
W.B. Fisch, Fall 2011
Tentative Assignments

Page references are to the coursebook, Cohen, Varat & Amar, CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (13th ed. Foundation 2009); "Supp." refers to the authors' 2011 Supplement, which is also required for the course. Assignments are listed by number rather than date, to account for possible scheduling hitches. I hope to cover roughly one per class period, but don't expect clockwork precision!

(before first class) Read the Constitution, pp. 2-16, as well as the introductory handout available on the course website -- we will not discuss this material specifically in class beyond a few opening remarks

Click on the assignment number for an outline of issues to be discussed in class on that material (will be appear and be updated throughout the semester)

  • (1) Ch. 2. JUDICIAL REVIEW
            1. The Legitimacy of Judicial Review, pp. 24-37
  • (2)    2. Congressional Control of Judicial Review, pp. 37-43
        Ch. 3. THE JURISDICTION OF FEDERAL COURTS IN CONSTITUTIONAL CASES
            1. Supreme Court Review of State Court Decisions, pp. 44-56
  • (3)    3. Cases and Controversies and Justiciability
                A. In General, pp. 59-62
                B. Standing
                    1) Warth and notes, pp. 62-74
  • (4)            2-3) Craig, Lujan, Raines, and Akins, pp. 74-90 (Third-party rights, citizens/taxpayers); notes on Bond, Supp. p. 2, and Winn, Supp. p. 3
  • (5)        E. Political Questions, pp. 103-120
                    The Amendment Process, pp. 120-125
  • (6)  [Principles of Judicial Interpretation
                Calder v. Bull, pp. 505-6 (other materials in handout posted on the website)]
  • (7) Ch. 4. THE SCOPE OF NATIONAL POWER
            1. The Constitutional Convention and note, pp. 129-135
            2. Sources of National Power: Early Developments
                McCulloch v. Maryland and notes, pp. 135-150
  • (8)       Gibbons, Willson, License Cases, Cooley and notes, pp. 150-164
  • (9)    3. The Scope of the National Power Today
                A. The Commerce Power
                   background, Heart of Atlanta Motel, Katzenbach, pp. 164-179
  • (10)         Morrison, pp. 179-193; Gonzales v. Raich and notes, pp. 193-208
  • (11)        B-D. Taxing, Spending, War and Treaty Powers, pp. 208-228
  • (12) Ch. 5. STATE SOVEREIGNTY AND FEDERAL REGULATION
            1. State Immunity from Federal Regulation
                New York v. U.S., Printz v. U.S., and Reno v. Condon, pp. 246-271
  • (13) 2.  Enforcement of Federal Rights Against State Officers: The Eleventh Amendment, pp. 271-284
  • (14) Ch. 6. THE SCOPE OF STATE POWER
            2. Discrimination Against Interstate Commerce, pp. 290-295
            3. Implied Restrictions of the Commerce Clause -- Transportation
                Crutcher, Buck and Thompson, pp. 295-296; Kassel and note, pp. 301-308
  • (15)  4. Implied Restrictions of the Commerce Clause -- Production and Trade
                A. Restricting Importation and Insulating In-state Business
                    Dean Milk, Clover Leaf Creamery, and West Lynne Creamery and Walsh, Pp. 308-320
                   B. Requiring Business Operations in Home State, pp. 320-324
  • (16)      C. Preserving Resources for In-State Consumption
             Philadelphia v. New Jersey and notes, pp. 325-330; Maine v.
                    Taylor and CampsNewfound, pp. 335-341
                   D. Preserving State-Owned Resources for In-State Use, pp. 342-351
  • (17)  5. Effect of Other Constitutional Provisions on State Regulatory Power
                A. Article IV s. 2 Privileges and Immunities, pp. 364-377 
  • (18) Ch. 7. SEPARATION OF POWERS
            1. The President's Power to Determine National Policy
                 A. In General, pp. 402-407
                 B. International Relations, pp. 407-413
  • (19)      C. War and National Defense: Hamdi and Boumedienne, pp. 417-460
  • (20)  2. Congressional Interference with Presidential Prerogatives , pp. 471-491; note on Free Enterprise Fund, Supp. pp. 9-11
  • (21) Ch 8. THE BILL OF RIGHTS, THE CIVIL WAR AMENDMENTS AND THEIR INTERRELATIONSHIP
            1. The Pre-Civil War Background, pp. 505-512
            2. The Initial Interpretation of the Civil War Amendments
                Slaughter-House Cases, pp. 512-527  
  • (22)  Ch. 9. THE DUE PROCESS, CONTRACT AND JUST COMPENSATION CLAUSES
            1. Economic Regulatory Legislation
                A. The Rise and Fall of Due Process
                    Allgeyer, p. 553-554; Lochner, pp. 554-559; Nebbia, pp. 561-563;
                    Carolene Products pp. 564-565; Williamson, pp. 567-569; Ferguson, pp. 569-571
  • (23)      B. The Contract Clause, pp. 574-589
  • (24)  2. Protection of Personal Liberties
                A. Introduction ("privacy"), pp. 625-633; note on NASA v. Nelson, Supp. p. 47
                B. Family and Marital Relationships
                    Moore, pp. 633-639, and Michael H., pp. 646-663
  • (25)      C. Personal Autonomy
                    Eisenstadt and Roe, pp. 663-674
  • (26)          Casey, pp. 674-693
  • (27)          Lawrence and Glucksberg, pp. 705-730
  • (28) Ch. 10. THE EQUAL PROTECTION CLAUSE
            2. Social and Economic Regulatory Legislation, pp. 754-769         
  • (29)  3. Suspect Classifications
                A. Classifications Disadvantaging Racial Minorities, pp. 769-781    
  • (30)      B. Racial Segregation in Schools and Other Public Facilities
                   application of Equal Protection to schools, and basic remedies, pp. 781-796
  • (31)         northern schools and burden of proof, remedial limits, etc., pp. 796-812
  • (32)      C. Classifications based on Gender
                   Reed, Frontiero, Craig and notes, pp. 813-826
  • (33)          U.S. v. Virginia, Nguyen v. INS and notes, pp. 840-858
  • (34)      D. The Requirement of a Discriminatory Purpose
                    Washington v. Davis, pp. 858-865; Feeney, pp. 867-870; Rogers v. Lodge and note, pp. 873-881
  • (35)      E. "Benign" Discrimination: Affirmative Action
                    Croson and Adarand, pp. 896-928; note on Ricci, Supp. pp. 49-56
  • (36)           Grutter and Gratz, pp. 928-952
  • (37)      F. Classifications Disadvantaging Aliens, pp. 971-980
  • (38) Ch. 13. GOVERNMENTAL CONTROL OF THE CONTENT OF EXPRESSION
            1. Introduction to Problems of Content Control of Speech
                A. Introduction, pp. 1320-1327
                B. World War I, etc.: Masses, Schenck, Abrams, and note, pp. 1327-1333
                D. Current Status of "Clear and Present Danger", pp. 1354-1361       
  • (39)  2. Vagueness, Overbreadth and Prior Restraint
                A.  Vagueness pp. 1361-1372; note on Stevens, Supp. pp. 79-81 (first excerpt, not second!)
  • (40)      B.   Prior Restraint, pp. 1372-1386
  • (41)  3. Speech Conflicting with Other Community Values
                C. Control of "Fighting Words" and Offensive Speech
                    Cantwell, Chaplinski, and Cohen, pp. 1462-1465; note on Snyder v. Phelps, Supp. pp. 101-107; Black, pp. 1470-1481
  • (42) Ch. 14. RESTRICTIONS ON TIME, PLACE OR MANNER OF EXPRESSION
            1. The Traditional Public Forum: Streets and Parks, pp. 1527-1549
  • (43)  2. The Non-Traditional Forum, pp. 1549-1565
  • (44) Ch. 15. PROTECTION OF PENUMBRAL FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS
            1. Symbolic Speech, pp. 1635-1647
  • (45) Ch. 17. RELIGION AND THE CONSTITUTION
            1. The Establishment Clause
                A. Introduction, pp. 1830-1835
                B. Government Exercises, Ceremonies, Displays and Practices
                    1. Public Schools, pp. 1835-1850
  • (46)          2. Religious Speech and Displays on Public Property
                           McCreary County v. ACLU and Van Orden v. Perry, pp. 1850-1874; note on Summum, Supp. pp. 130-135
  • (47)               Note on equal access, Capitol Square and Good News Club, pp. 1874‑1891
  • (48)     C. Financial Aid to Church‑Related Schools and Church‑Related Instruction
                    1. Elementary and Secondary Schools, pp. 1891-1920
  • (49, 50)  These assignments will not be covered in class or on the examination!         
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