Previous Titles

2017-18: Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II

Henrietta Lacks
Infamy: The Shocking Story of the Japanese American Internment in World War II by Richard Reeves provides a powerful narrative about the 120,000 Japanese-Americans and aliens forced from their homes and into prison camps following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Reeves’ book passionately describes the experiences of individuals and families, and invites reflection on the fragility of fundamental legal rights.


2016-17: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot

Henrietta Lacks
The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebeca Skloot is a fascinating exploration of issues touching medicine, healthcare policy and ethics, genetics and identity, property rights, race, and class. Best of all, it is a well-told story that is hard to put down once you’ve started.


2015-16: Just Mercy, by Bryan Stevenson

Just_Mercy
Just Mercy, by Bryan Stevenson recounts Stevenson’s experiences representing people on death row as part of a nonprofit law practice and demands that lawyers see the world from another’s perspective.