The Court Takes the Bite Out of the Exhaustion Requirement of the PLRA

The Prison Litigation Reform Act (“PLRA”) was enacted in 1996 primarily to reduce prisoner litigation.  The passage of the PLRA led to a decrease in the number of cases filed in federal court by prisoners.  However, there is also evidence that suggests that even meritorious claims are barred from federal court based on technicalities through a failure to comply with the PLRA.  While the initial intent of the PLRA was to prohibit the increasing flow of frivolous suits by prisoners at the time, the consequences have been dire for prisoners seeking redress for meritorious claims that fail to meet the PLRA’s high standard of exhaustion.

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Appropriation or Adult Adjudication: Missouri Legislature’s Big Misstep in Passing “Raise the Age” Law

In 2018, the Missouri General Assembly enacted a law to “Raise the Age” for automatically trying certain juveniles as adults within the criminal system.  For T.J., a seventeen-year-old in Missouri, and for many juvenile service providers, this law was the subject of confusion due to an ambiguity within the law regarding the effective date.  The Supreme Court of Missouri had to resolve this dispute to clarify which law was applicable to T.J. and when the jurisdiction of the juvenile division was actually broadened.

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The End of the Fight Between the Missouri Legislature and Missouri Supreme Court in Expanding and Contracting Punitive Damages in Medical Malpractice Actions

“Rhoden’s place in the history of Missouri medical malpractice reform and the subsequent amendment of the statute to require intentional conduct by healthcare providers to sustain a punitive damages award is in the best interest of Missouri healthcare—a state with a shortage of physicians and a history of medical malpractice insurance dilemmas.”

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