Category: Prof. Royce de R. Barondes ⋅ Page 1

Missouri Agency Adjusts Medical-Marijuana Regulations after Professor Barondes Submits Comments

In late May, the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services finalized emergency regulations governing medical-marijuana use. As previously proposed, the regulations would have limited qualifying patients to persons who “primarily reside[]” in Missouri. As Professor Royce de R. Barondes noted in comments he submitted in April, the initial proposal “impose[d] an exclusion on the scope of qualifying patients beyond…

Professor Barondes Quoted in Story on the Ethics of Representing Clients in Medical Marijuana Industry

Professor Royce Barondes was quoted in an article addressing the legal ethics of representing medical marijuana businesses. The article by Nicholas Phillips, “Cannabis Counsel,”  appeared in the May 20, 2019 issue of Missouri Lawyers Weekly. With the passage of Amendment 2 in Missouri, eliminating state criminal restrictions on medical marijuana, law firms could be seeing an increase in related work.…

Professor Barondes Testifies Before Missouri Senate Committee

On Jan. 28, Professor Royce Barondes testified before the Missouri Senate’s Judiciary and Civil and Criminal Jurisprudence Committee. He addressed how existing and proposed legislation concerning expungement of crimes affects firearms rights. The committee is chaired by Senator Tony Luetkemeyer, ’09, one of Professor Barondes’ former…

Professor Barondes Speaks at Missouri Supreme Court Review Hosted by K.C. Chapter of the Federalist Society

Professor Royce Barondes was a speaker at a Missouri Supreme Court Review hosted by the Kansas City Lawyers Chapter of the Federalist Society. In his presentation, he addressed the civil right to bear arms and the Missouri Supreme Court’s April 2018 opinion in Alpert v. State of Missouri. The case involves the constitutionality of a 2008 Missouri statutory change that…

Professor Barondes Publishes in Houston Law Review

Professor Royce Barondes recently published his article, “Contumacious Responses to Firearms Legislation (LEOSA) Balancing Federalism Concerns,” in the Houston Law Review. In the article, he examines federal legislation, Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA), designed to enhance public safety by allowing off-duty law enforcement officers and certain retired officers to remain armed, including during out-of-state travels, notwithstanding some of the…

Idaho Law Review Publishes Article by Professor Barondes

Professor Royce Barondes recently published his article, “Conditioning Exercise of Firearms Rights on Unlimited Terry Stops,” in the “Terry v. Ohio at 50” Symposium Edition of the Idaho Law Review. In the article, he examines an issue percolating in the lower courts: whether reasonable suspicion a person is armed is, by itself, sufficient to initiate a Terry…

Professor Barondes Comments on 3D Printed Guns Case

Professor Royce Barondes was interviewed by KOMU-TV, “Legal experts weigh in on 3D printed guns debate,” where he discussed a settlement of a Federal lawsuit involving internet posting of computer-aided design files for 3D-printed firearms. The internet posts had been prohibited by U.S. Executive Branch implementation of a statute designed to address international export and import of weapons. The settlement, which…

Professor Barondes Presents Paper at University of Idaho

Professor Royce Barondes presented his paper, “Conditioning Exercise of Firearms Rights on Unlimited Terry Stops,” on April 6 at the University of Idaho College of Law’s symposium “Terry v. Ohio at 50: Considering the Past, Present and Future of…

Professor Barondes Publishes Op-Ed about the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act

Professor Royce Barondes published an op-ed at TheHill.com discussing Executive Branch interpretation of the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act of 2004. The statute is designed to allow qualifying current and retired law enforcement officers to carry firearms in most locations throughout the United States. As Professor Barondes explains in the op-ed, assorted administrative pronouncements have unnecessarily curtailed the scope of…